The Shopping List 5-11-11

There are some unexpected benefits in reviewing comics for Bells’ Kitchen. First, I end up reading the books twice. I read first on Wednesday and then again when I sit down to write my review. I pick up so much that I didn’t noticed the first time around. I also recognize when I’m not enjoying a book. If a book keeps getting two star reviews, it’s time to drop it. I may not always want to sit down and write, Comfort in These PagesIt’s something that is always there. It forces me to practice writing. Now, I can put it on a resume as a giant writing sample. I don’t have many friends who read comics, so it also gets my ideas out of my head. It’s nice. Enough taking. Here’s the books.

Daredevil: Reborn #4Daredevil: Reborn by Andy Diggle and Davide Gianfelice ****

I’ve had some real complaints about Andy Diggle’s work on Daredevil: Reborn but it goes out with a truly enjoyable issue.

My favorite sequence of the book was the one with Matt Murdock talking to the blind boy. The kid’s “Quit sayin’ your sorry!” speech is really well done, pointing out how much heroes are focused on galactic problems, but ignore small ones. This issue shows what Superman should be doing on his walk across America.

The action sequence was also a nice surprise. I’ve often seen people use their enemy’s weapons against, them but heroin as a weapon? Only in Daredevil: Reborn.

So yeah, the writing finally got to the level I expected from Diggle. Too bad that this issue ends his run.

I really liked Davide Gianfelice’s art on this series. It acts as a nice transition from the Maleev/Lark/De La Torre days to the upcoming Rivera/Martin days. Of course, Billy Tan will always be out of place, but that’s Shadowland for you. I hope Gianfelice sticks around.

My only issue with the book is the final pages. I know it’s necessary to start Mark Waid’s run, but Foggy seems too quick to forgive Matt for a bunch of the shit that’s gone down. Even if Matt has faced his fears and is ready to move forward, I’m not sure everyone else is.

Fear Itself: Youth in Revolt #1Fear Itself: Youth In Revolt #1 by Sean McKeever and Mike Norton ***

And so starts the deluge of Fear Itself tie-ins.

Any reader knows how much I like teen books, so between the cast and Sean McKeever’s name, this was a guaranteed buy.

The cast is also the strength of the book. We get members from The Initiative, Young Allies, and even The Order. No one gets that much time, but it’s nice to see a varied cast, especially with characters that are so underexposed.

I do have a problem with the timing of this book. Because of the release schedule, we haven’t seen this much hysteria in the main Fear Itself title. I don’t really understand why this is going on. I can’t tell if this “fear” is just a reaction to the hammers falling or something supernatural coming from the Serpent and all that. The Blitzkrieg USA would have been a sufficient inciting incident, but that happens 16 pages into the book. Thor Girl (still a terrible name) gets attacked for having a hammer, but we don’t even know who’s getting each of the hammers, let alone really see anyone use them. How does the public know to fear her? In another schedule issue (though not a problem), Gravity makes a comment about “Poor Nomad.” So … what happened? She was alive in Avengers Academy #13 (or will that take place previous to Onslaught Unleashed on continuity is established?).

Speaking of Gravity, he and Firestar have quickly become the hottest will they/won’t they of comics. I’m sure they will and can’t wait until they do. Let’s hope they get some sort of book where they get the chance.

Mike Norton is a chameleon of an artist. I’ve heard him speak about often aping the style of the artist before him. Is this Norton’s personal style, then? It’s good. Nothing special, but good. Something about Prodigy’s costume makes him look villainous to me. Maybe it’s the sharp metal. Maybe that you can’t see any of his face. Maybe the prominence of orange.

I realize I’ve said a lot of nothing in this review, but mostly this issue is concerned with setting up the story. I can’t until the cast building is finished and this book really gets going.

Flash #12The Flash #12 by Geoff Johns, Scott Kolins and Francis Manapul **

It may have been four issues, but not much happened in this arc. Hell, it’s been 12 issues, and not much has happened in this series. This issue starts with too quickly finishing a couple of plots, then we get two pages of epilogue and – BOOM – we’re off to Flashpoint.

As the name might suggest, “The Road to Flashpoint” is more about plot than its characters. Yes, last month’s intervention was all about Barry Allen’s relationships with his friends, but the more important parts of this story were all event and no fallout. Hot Pursuit never gets a chance to be a real character. He’s a plot in the form of a man. Bad. The same with Patty Spivot. If the book needed a crime scene analyst, Johns couldn’t have pulled one from the force? It’s nice that he pulled someone from the past, but her drama with Barry is more distraction than plot. There could have been a real story there, but it’s cut off so Flashpoint can start.

If anyone thinks I’ve been overly critical of Scott Kolins art, just read this issue. The difference between his and Manapul’s pages is ridiculous. The inking is so dark and heavy on Kolins’ pages. Are dark and heavy EVER words you want to associate with Flash? No.

I’m sure we’ll have a Flash book of some sort after Flashpoint, but looking back on these 12 issues, this series has been a disappointment. Not much has happened in the life of Barry Allen. He’s back, but done nothing that Wally West couldn’t have done. Manapul’s glorious art has often been substituted by Scott Kolins. Between rolling out of Blackest Night and into Flashpoint, The Flash was just too distracted to tell great speedster stories. Sad.

Flashpoint #1Flashpoint #1 by Geoff Johns and Andy Kubert ****

The Flash may not have done a great job setting up this story, but here it is. Remember how House of M didn’t place you in that world until issue #2? No such problem here. By setting everything up in Flash, we get dropped right in. It doesn’t make Flash any more enjoyable, but it’s better this way.

Alternate reality stories and big events are both great times to try to push a character to the A-list. Here, Johns pulls his boy Cyborg out of the Teen Titans and into the spotlight. I also like the idea of Citizen Cold (a heroic Captain Cold), but it seems he’s still got a dark side. It’s also nice to see Wonder Woman in such an important role. She’s been too ignored by events recently. Element Woman, seeming like a hero version of Delirium, is primed to be my breakout character of the series.

Since I got into comics, I haven’t read much by Andy Kubert. Because of that, I see his art as DC house style, mostly because of the Jim Lee similarities. I’m not accusing him of aping his style; I know they came up together. And besides, Jim Lee’s great. That’s why he’s Jim Lee. It’s just disappointing to see more of the same.

For such a different universe, the cliffhanger is not as big as I’d like. So Batman is Thomas Wayne. Whatever. He’s Batman. Same motivations, just more violent. Again, whatever. Give me reason to be invested in this world, not one character.

Overall, It’s a good start. I can already see the in-universe conflict as well as the problem Barry Allen is going to have getting back to his reality. Let’s go!

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