The Shopping List 12-29-10

Books were delayed a bit for my shop last week. Despite a Thursday pickup, it was a good week. They’re delayed a day, I get delayed a day. That’s fair, no?

Before we get into the books, I want to point out Spider-Girl’s Twitter feed. @The_Spider_Girl. It’s maintained by Paul Tobin, who writes the series and she (he) seems great at replying to comments. You should follow it.

No. No I shouldn'tWell, yeah. It would be kind of weird to follow yourself. And narcissistic. Still, whatever it takes to keep a books sales up. Which Spider-Girl isn’t too good at. But I’ll get to that later.

Captain America #613Captain America #613 by Ed Brubaker and Butch Guice, Sean McKeever and Filipe Andrade ****

Another month. Another steady issue of Cap. I’m running out of things to say.

To review:
– Newest chapter in years-long epic
– Best supporting cast in comics
– Even without a shield in hand, Steve Rogers is THE MAN
– Most consistent art on the stands, even with three inkers and two colorists

Specific to this issue, Butch Guice gets to draw some really crazy stuff in Sin’s dream. And Brubaker keeps raising the stakes. It’s not enough to put Cap in jail. He’s disgracing him through the media and threatening to blowup America’s most famous landmark. Here we go.

8-page segments can often have too little happening, (see Detective Comics, next) but McKeever continues to write an exciting back-up tale starring Nomad. Unfortunately, Filipe Andrade doesn’t bring the same level of talent. His art isn’t exaggerated; it’s inconsistent. Sometimes it’s rounded. Sometimes it’s jagged. If he works out some issues, maybe he could be a good artist. He’s just not there yet. Hopefully, he’s got something new up his sleeve for the upcoming Onslaught Unleashed.

Detective Comics #872Detective Comics #872 by Scott Snyder, Jock and Francesco Francavilla ****

Batman’s a character that I really like, but it takes something special to actually get me to pick up the book. It just seems like there are so few unique stories told with him. So it’s great to say that I love what Scott Snyder is doing. He’s telling Batman stories that focus on the human side of the character, but without that pain in the ass Bruce Wayne guy. I know people loved Morrison’s Batman & Robin, but it didn’t grab me. Weird villain, punchy punchy, the end. I need to read it as one big chunk, I guess.

Dick is someone who is fun to root for, as opposed to Bruce where I just root against Joker, Two-Face, etc. Dick banters with Babs, flies a one-wheel motorcycle, then goes to a villain-paraphernalia auction in a burnt up old theater. Bruce would have just gritted his teeth and kicked until there was no one left to kick.

Our mystery bad guy sure is creepy. The first item up for auction is the crowbar the Joker used to beat Jason Todd to death. “There seems to be some human tissue still on the edge.” Ugh. The auctioneer must have some sort of connection, because he’s planned well ahead for Batman’s appearance at the auction. Can’t wait to see how Dick gets out of this.

The first time I saw Jock’s artwork was the Vertigo series Faker with Mike Carey. There, it was often hard to determine exactly what each panel was depicting. He’s fixed those problems here, even using some abnormal panel layouts to add to the tension. Often, silhouetted characters are laid over other images. By breaking out of panels and being drawn larger, they are literally more imposing,

The Commissioner Gordon back-up is too short for its own good. All that really happens here is the Jim tells Babs what’s up. She leaves and we are left with the same cliffhanger as last issue. But it impresses me for one reason – Francesco Francavilla’s colors. Francavilla’s art, with its thick brushstrokes and  large swatches of contrasting colors, is moody, dour, and other adjectives.

Flash #8Flash #8 by Geoff Johns and Scott Kolins ****

The actual idea of Reverse Flash confuses me. I understand his powers are a reaction to Flash’s but then why does he really hate him? Was that covered in here? Disirregardlessly …

In every time travel movie, the main character is warned that if s/he changes anything in the past, it could change the future. But, what if that was the idea? What if you wanted to change the future?

I was a little rough on the Captain Boomerang spotlight last issue, but Johns and Kolins really turn it around this time. Johns does some experimental stuff this issue, with Reverse Flash turning back time mid-page. He changes to past, which changes his future. Brother’s a pain in the ass? Go back in time so he was never born. Professor won’t share his research with you? Go back in time and take his job. It’s a really refreshing twist on well-trodden ground. It’s wordy, but it tells a full, interesting story. I can’t wait to see how this seed blooms.

I find the same problems with Scott Kolins art this month that I did last month. Kolins’ pencils and Brian Buccellato’s colors both try to render shadows, making pages over-rendered and too dark. It’s a common problem in comics. If you’ve got an artist who loves crosshatching, and a colorist darkens the areas that are crosshatched, they’re doubling efforts at the cost of the art. A penciler needs to know that his inker will treat the pencils correctly. The penciler and inker need to trust that the colorist will render shadows and highlights in the best way to fit the art. They need to put more faith in each other.

Next month should be a boss issue: A) The return of regular artist Fancis Manapul, B) debut of a new villain, Hot Pursuit, and C) Team up with Wally West and Bart Allen. Awesome.

Spider-Girl #2Spider-Girl #2 by Paul Tobin and Clayton Henry ***

I appreciated Spider-Girl #1 because it was a good book. It felt like part of the Marvel universe, but without being weighed down by continuity. I don’t really know her Araña past, and I didn’t need to. It was easily accessible and made me eager to continue reading.

This issue offered much of the same, but it took a swift turn that I don’t like. After establishing Anya’s great relationship with her dad last issue, he gets killed. REALLY? WE NEED THAT? I thought this book was going to star someone who enjoys being a hero, free of moping. I don’t think that’s going to happen anymore. Anya continues being a hero even after losing her powers. That’s a strong character. She’s got the motivation she needs. She didn’t need to lose her father too.

Something else I mentioned last time was that the book would live and die by age recognition and guest stars. Last month we got the Fantastic Four, this we also get Red Hulk. And based on sales – less than 24,000 copies – this book does not have long. You’ve got to expect, what? A 20% decrease in sales for this issue? So that leaves 19,200, just below the cancellation threshold of 20,000. And that’s only issue #2. We’ve got another Young Allies on our hands. Help a good book out! Pick up a copy!

One place I can’t fault Spider-Girl is the art. The style switches more than I’d like from Clayton Henry on the heroic first half to Ray-Anthony Height on the private life second half. (Thanks to Comic Book DB for letting me know Height’s full name. No thanks to Marvel and their credits page.) Henry draws some great emotion, but I may like Heights work more. It’s a bit less nuanced, it has a nice smooth style. The bright pages by both artists suggest we may have some hope for a cheerful book after all.

Shall we put the over/under for cancellation at 5.5 issues? It’s a shame. This is the sort of book Marvel and the superhero genre need.

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